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BEEM-UP Site Delft

Country & City

  • The Netherlands
  • Delft

Project

Contact Information

The BEEM-UP building site in the Netherlands is located in the north-west of Delft, approximately 2.5 km from the city centre. The group of buildings is called Complex 5 and consists of 108 dwellings distributed over 3 types in 8 blocks constructed in 1958. The area has a specific identity as the surrounding buildings share the typical Dutch brick facade, a remarkable architectural quality.

*Please note that there is no design data for the electrical consumption of the demo site besides the lighting.

 

An overall area of 9 128 m2 was refurbished in Delft. The monitored energy consumption accounted for 191 kWh/m²/yr before the renovation and 139 kWh/m²/yr on the first year of monitoring after the retrofitting. The space heating represents the highest share of the load, with 137 kWh/m²/yr before the works and 75 kWh/m²/yr after. The domestic hot water increased its value from 21.5 to 33 kWh/m²/yr although a reduction had been expected. From the data provided by the project, it can be observed that the simulations did not have enough data to properly model the demand, and therefore the design results before the retrofitting are on the whole higher than that monitored. This is the main reason behind the growth of domestic hot water consumption after the works.

The total primary energy for the design and monitoring have been calculated using the data provided by BEEM-UP, resulting in 2418 MWh/yr. The BEEM-UP project did not set any goals regarding the reduction of CO2 emissions.

Financial & Economic

Financial & Economic
Country
Encountered barriers
Solution
The Netherlands

The project encountered a problem with multiple families living in the same building. Only 40 % of the tenants were interested in the solar boiler technology that the project sought to implement. The reason for this was that numerous tenants had already fitted their own individual private heating installations.

In order to overcome the low interest in the product among tenants and to avoid the implementation of two different energy sources for different tenants in the same building, the existing private installations were bought by the project and improved. Following this, these tenants rented the system for the same price that was offered to the others. This method guaranteed that all tenants were treated in the same way and were able to still own their own system.

Regulatory & Administrative

Regulatory & Administrative
Country
Encountered barriers
Solution
The Netherlands

Dutch tenant protection regulation demands that 70 % of the tenants must agree to a physical improvement of the houses in case the landlord wants to increase the rent, thus reclaiming the costs of the improvement. This can result in the tenants disagreeing with the necessary refurbishments and blocking the project.

This was avoided as the envelope refurbishments and other improvements were implemented without adding extra costs to the rent.

Best Practices

Best Practices
Country

Description

The Netherlands

The project developers pursued a strong communication campaign aiming to engage the tenants. They had numerous open-house sessions to inform the tenants on planned and ongoing renovations and created a tenants’ feedback group to exchange opinions on the necessary renovations. The tenants were asked to fill in several questionnaires on their energy behaviour and consumption, which led the organisation of informational sessions to promote more sustainable energy consumption patterns.

Challenges

Challenges
Country

Description

The Netherlands

The improvement of the insulation value of the envelope is quite modest and does not change the heating habits. For the envelope to have an effect, a much higher thermal resistance and sealing is needed with side effects, such as the need for balanced flow ventilation. In the Delft project, the renovation led to an up-to date performance of the envelope, but the improvement to the heating zone, i.e. the living room and kitchen, is minimal. The main conclusion is that dwellings with sober installations before the renovation will not save much energy with modern installations that provide much more comfort. The involvement of the tenants has had a positive impact on the quality of the community and the acceptance of upheaval during the renovation.

The Netherlands

The results from the Dutch demo site were quite different from the predictions. The expected demand regarding space heating was met, but since the simulations expected a higher energy demand prior to the refurbishment, the expectation on savings was not achieved. The discrepancies could be explained by the fact that the calculations were made with the assumption that the heating and ventilation systems were functioning perfectly, as well as the way tenants used them. Also, the energy saving percentage did not include the rebound effects. For example, before the refurbishment, the tenants would only heat one room, thus keeping the consumption quite low. After the works were performed, more spaces were heated and therefore the savings were not that high. This is especially true because the calculations were made based on the whole building being heated, and not just one room, and therefore the simulations anticipated greater energy consumption.

Energy: 

The tenants in Delft had the possibility of choosing a specific energy reduction refurbishment package according to their preferences. Measures included: solar panel, floor insulation and home energy management with a feedback system. The refurbishment has resulted in a substantial energy demand reduction for space heating.

Energy efficiency in buildings

  • Retrofitting the building envelope
    • Thermal envelope was improved
    • High-performance windows (HR++ with layer of metal foil) were installed providing 1.6 times better insulation than double-glazing
  • Building services (HVAC and lighting)
    • Optimised lighting: LED lighting was installed in the common areas
    • Mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery: improved mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery was connected to the living room.

Energy systems integration

  • Thermal collectors
    • Solar boiler was installed in 50 of the dwellings for warm water and heating
ICT: 
  • Building energy management system
    • ICT energy management system was installed in 34 of the dwellings, including smart meters. The feedback system gives occupants a real-time insight into their electricity and gas consumption, as well as weekly and monthly statistics. It provides the user with a tool to control the heating in the house via an application on their smart phone.

The investment cost for the intervention has been EUR 388/m² making a total of EUR 3.54 million. According to the data provided, the annual cost savings for energy are EUR 77 259 on a total cost of EUR 103 012. Therefore, the annual costs after renovation are equal to EUR 25 753.

The resulting payback period is  more than 30 years. The financial analysis shows that a profitability of the project is not given due to the high investments in comparison to the low energy cost savings. This however does not reflect the non-monetary benefits that might occur through the implementation.

Overall, the BEEM-UP project achieved substantial improvements. The energy consumption in the Delft project is 15 % lower for gas (heating, hot water and cooking) than the average Dutch household and even 30 % lower than the average electricity consumption. Also comfort conditions have been apparently reached thanks to the refurbishment according to the tenants’ positive comments, which were collected during interviews with them.